Teacher answering question from student as her desk.

Questions to Ask Educators

Every child can have problems learning from time to time, and parents are often the first to notice. Some learning problems come and go. But if they seem to persist, it’s important for parents to communicate with their child’s teachers and other caregivers about difficulties. Grades and comments on report cards can be helpful as a conversation starter. They reflect school performance over time and indicate how well a child is meeting learning expectations. It’s also helpful when parents keep records (e.g., work samples) and take notes of things they observe—even for children as young as 4 or 5. Parents can share their specific concerns with teachers and other specialists, offering perspective about how long their child has been struggling. More information is always best when preparing to make important decisions about how to help children succeed across all areas of learning and behavior. 

Mother with child answering questions from a pediatrician.

Questions to Ask Pediatricians

Every child can have problems learning from time to time, and parents are often the first to notice. Some learning problems come and go. But if they seem to persist, it’s important for parents to communicate with their child’s teachers and other caregivers about difficulties. Pediatric health care providers are interested in your child’s educational health, too—not just their physical well-being. If you’re concerned about your child’s progress in school, be sure to talk with your child’s health care provider. They can help you figure out if your child’s struggle is suggestive of a learning disability, and they can help you decide if testing is needed.